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1,000 Patients Rate 54 Treatments for Endometriosis

August 2nd, 2011 Alexandra Carmichael Posted in Infographics, Research Findings No Comments »

For the live-updated, interactive version of this infographic, click here.

 

Endometriosis was the second condition we started with at CureTogether. We’ve been reluctant to publish this study until now because it’s quite controversial. But with detailed participation from over 1,000 patients, we decided it was time.

What’s the controversy? The #1 patient-rated treatment for Endometriosis is major surgery: hysterectomy.

We heard from some very concerned endometriosis activists about this, who don’t want women to go out and electively undergo such a radical procedure without trying gentler approaches first. So take this as a caveat – we’re not advocating that you get a hysterectomy, we’re just reporting the results of a patient survey.

The rest of the results are in the graph above, which is divided into four squares…

- Top right: the most popular and effective treatments (including Heat pads and Vicodin)

- Top left: effective treatments that not many people have tried, so they may be options to think about (including Marijuana and Physical therapy)

- Lower right: very popular but not very effective (including Birth control pills and Exercise)

- Lower left: neither popular nor effective (including NuvaRing and Depo-Provera)

Where did this data come from? This is the result of a 3-year CureTogether study on Endometriosis. To thank everyone for participating, we’re publishing this study openly and freely.

This is part of our regular series of research findings. Of course, with each of these findings, there is a potential bias in patient self-selection and recall. Every research study has some bias, so we present these findings as just what they are – patient-reported data – to stimulate discussion and generate new insights for further research.

Please tweet, blog, or pass this along to anyone who can benefit or is interested in Endometriosis. Thank you!

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9 Most Effective Vulvodynia Treatments

July 26th, 2011 Alexandra Carmichael Posted in Infographics, Research Findings 27 Comments »

For the live-updated, interactive version of this infographic, click here.

A year ago, we published 7 surprisingly simple treatments for female pain. Vulvodynia (chronic vulvar/vaginal pain) was the first condition CureTogether started with back in 2008, because I live with it. I repeated the analysis today, and found 9 treatments that clearly stand out as most effective.

This chart is based on 1,617 women with vulvodynia who answered 8,434 quantitative questions in CureTogether surveys.

The top 9 most effective treatments for vulvodynia are:

1. Wear loose-fitting clothes
2. Physical therapy
3. Ice
4. No underwear
5. Trigger point therapy
6. Avoid sex (or just avoid penetration)
7. Clitoral distraction with vibrator or by hand
8. Myofascial release
9. Rinse with water after urination

Another new thing on this chart: NuvaRing was added as a treatment, and was rated to make vulvodynia much worse instead of better.

To navigate the graph above:

The top right quadrant shows the most popular and effective treatments (e.g. loose-fitting clothes, avoid sex), and the top left quadrant shows treatments that not many people have tried but that have above-average effectiveness, so they may be options to think about (e.g. trigger point therapy, oatmeal baths).

Treatments in the lower right quadrant are ones that lots of people have tried but that have below-average effectiveness (e.g. Lidocaine, antibiotics), and treatments in the lower left quadrant are reported as neither popular nor effective, so you may want to consider this when choosing a treatment (e.g. NuvaRing, Lanacane).

Where did this data come from? CureTogether members have been anonymously sharing symptoms and treatments for almost 3 years now. We analyzed and visualized the data into infographic form to make it more accessible. To thank everyone for their contributions, we’re releasing this result back to the community for free.

This is part of our regular series of research findings. Of course, with each of these findings, there is a potential bias in patient self-selection and recall. Every research study has some bias, so we present these findings as just what they are – patient-reported data – to stimulate discussion and generate new insights for further research. Stay tuned for more and please let us know in the comments below if this was helpful or interesting for you.

Please tweet, blog, or pass this along to anyone who can benefit or is interested in vulvodynia. Thank you!

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Lower Back Pain Study: 2,300 Patients Rate 46 Treatments

July 5th, 2011 Alexandra Carmichael Posted in Infographics, Research Findings 5 Comments »

For the live-updated, interactive version of this infographic, click here.

Lower Back Pain is our 12th most popular condition community at CureTogether. 2,398 of you have contributed your experiences with 21 symptoms and 46 different treatments that worked well and didn’t work so well.

We are proud to announce the current results of our Lower Back pain study, in the chart above.

The top patient-reported treatments for Lower Back pain are: Yoga/stretching, Hot tubs, Hydrocodone, Massage, Aleve, and Improved posture.

To navigate the graph above:

The top right quadrant shows the most popular and effective treatments, and the top left quadrant shows treatments that not many people have tried but that have above-average effectiveness, so they may be options to think about (e.g. Hot tub, Hydrocodone, anti-inflammatory diet).

Treatments in the lower right quadrant are ones that lots of people have tried but that have below-average effectiveness (e.g. Vitamin D, Omega 3), and treatments in the lower left quadrant are reported as neither popular nor effective, so you may want to consider this when choosing a treatment (e.g. Neurontin, Lyrica).

Where did this data come from? CureTogether members have been anonymously sharing symptoms and treatments for three years now. We analyzed and visualized the data into infographic form to make it more accessible. To thank everyone for their contributions, we’re releasing this result back to the community for free.

This is part of our regular series of research findings. Of course, with each of these findings, there is a potential bias in patient self-selection and recall. Every research study has some bias, so we present these findings as just what they are – patient-reported data – to stimulate discussion and generate new insights for further research. Stay tuned for more and please let us know in the comments below if this was helpful or interesting for you.

Please tweet, blog, or pass this along to anyone who can benefit or is interested in Lower Back Pain. Thank you!

 

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7 Surprising Treatments for Restless Legs

June 27th, 2011 Alexandra Carmichael Posted in Infographics, Research Findings 5 Comments »

For the live-updated, interactive version of this infographic, click here.

If you’re having trouble sleeping because of a tingling, crawling feeling that gives you an irresistible urge to move your legs, this study may be interesting for you.

At CureTogether, 1,292 people have joined our Restless Legs Syndrome study so far, contributing 1048 data points on treatments that worked and didn’t work for them. Here are the latest results.

So what works best for patients with Restless Legs Syndrome? Standing up and walking around, Mirapex, Clonazepam, Neurontin, Requip, and Potassium supplements take top spots in patient reports.

To navigate the graph above:

The top right quadrant shows the most popular and effective treatments, and the top left quadrant shows treatments that not many people have tried but that have above-average effectiveness, so they may be options to think about (e.g. Mirapex, Clonazepam, alternating warm and cool packs).

Treatments in the lower right quadrant are ones that lots of people have tried but that have below-average effectiveness (e.g. relaxation, Ibuprofen), and treatments in the lower left quadrant are reported as neither popular nor effective, so you may want to consider this when choosing a treatment (e.g. alcohol, Quinine).

Where did this data come from? CureTogether members have been anonymously sharing symptoms and treatments for three years now. We analyzed and visualized the data into infographic form to make it more accessible. To thank everyone for their contributions, we’re releasing this result back to the community for free.

This is part of our regular series of research findings. Of course, with each of these findings, there is a potential bias in patient self-selection and recall. Every research study has some bias, so we present these findings as just what they are – patient-reported data – to stimulate discussion and generate new insights for further research. Stay tuned for more and please let us know in the comments below if this was helpful or interesting for you.

Please tweet, blog, or pass this along to anyone who can benefit or is interested in Restless Legs Syndrome. Thank you!

 

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What Works for Eczema? Patient Study Results

June 21st, 2011 Alexandra Carmichael Posted in Infographics, Research Findings 9 Comments »

For the live-updated, interactive version of this infographic, click here.

Itchy, dry, red, crusty, flaking skin. Roughly 10% of the population is affected by Eczema. At CureTogether, 952 people have joined our Eczema study so far, contributing 1034 data points on treatments that worked and didn’t work for them. Here are the latest results.

So what works best for patients with Eczema? Triamcinolone, avoiding allergens, moisturizing frequently, Elocon, and avoiding sweating take top spots in patient reports.

To navigate the graph above:

The top right quadrant shows the most popular and effective treatments, and the top left quadrant shows treatments that not many people have tried but that have above-average effectiveness, so they may be options to think about (e.g. Triamcinolone, Elocon, Fluocinonide, avoiding sweating).

Treatments in the lower right quadrant are ones that lots of people have tried but that have below-average effectiveness (e.g. antihistamines, avoiding hair washing), and treatments in the lower left quadrant are reported as neither popular nor effective, so you may want to consider this when choosing a treatment (e.g. homeopathy, phototherapy, tanning).

Where did this data come from? CureTogether members have been anonymously sharing symptoms and treatments for three years now. We analyzed and visualized the data into infographic form to make it more accessible. To thank everyone for their contributions, we’re releasing this result back to the community for free.

This is part of our regular series of research findings. Of course, with each of these findings, there is a potential bias in patient self-selection and recall. Every research study has some bias, so we present these findings as just what they are – patient-reported data – to stimulate discussion and generate new insights for further research. Stay tuned for more and please let us know in the comments below if this was helpful or interesting for you.

Please tweet, blog, or pass this along to anyone who can benefit or is interested in Eczema. Thank you!

 

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New Patient Data for 32 Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatments

June 7th, 2011 Alexandra Carmichael Posted in Infographics, Research Findings 7 Comments »

For the live-updated, interactive version of this infographic, click here.

The daily pain of Rheumatoid Arthritis affects 1-2% of the world’s population, with women three times more affected than men. If you’re one of these people and have questions about how others are treating their symptoms, you’re not alone.

At CureTogether, 151 people joined our Rheumatoid Arthritis study, contributing 1127 data points on treatments that worked and didn’t work for them.

So what works best for patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis? Prednisone, Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN), reducing stress, Celebrex, and Heat take top spots in patient reports.

To navigate the graph above:

The top right quadrant shows the most popular and effective treatments, and the top left quadrant shows treatments that not many people have tried but that have above-average effectiveness, so they may be options to think about (e.g. LDN, joint replacement surgery, Epsom salt baths).

Treatments in the lower right quadrant are ones that lots of people have tried but that have below-average effectiveness (e.g. ibuprofen, vitamin D, glucosamine), and treatments in the lower left quadrant are reported as neither popular nor effective, so you may want to consider this when choosing a treatment (e.g. Chiropractic care, Azulfidine).

Where did this data come from? CureTogether members have been anonymously sharing symptoms and treatments for three years now. We analyzed and visualized the data into infographic form to make it more accessible. To thank everyone for their contributions, we’re releasing this result back to the community for free.

This is part of our regular series of research findings. Of course, with each of these findings, there is a potential bias in patient self-selection and recall. Every research study has some bias, so we present these findings as just what they are – patient-reported data – to stimulate discussion and generate new insights for further research. Stay tuned for more and please let us know in the comments below if this was helpful or interesting for you.

Please tweet, blog, or pass this along to anyone who can benefit or is interested in Rheumatoid Arthritis. Thank you!

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23 Surprisingly Effective Treatments for Depression (One Year Later)

May 3rd, 2011 Alexandra Carmichael Posted in Infographics, Research Findings 30 Comments »


For the live-updated, interactive version of this infographic, click here.

A year ago, we published one of our most popular findings – 6 surprisingly effective treatments for depression. I went ahead and repeated the analysis today, and now we have 23 treatments in the “surprisingly effective” category for depression.

This chart is based on 4,956 people with depression who participated in CureTogether surveys, compared to 944 people last year.

The top treatments are still exercise, sleep, and talking to others – they are popular and effective ways to feel better when you’re depressed.

But here are 23 things you may not have tried that thousands of others say worked well for them:

1. Music therapy
2. Art therapy
3. Mindful meditation
4. Massage therapy
5. Group sports
6. Breathwork
7. Light therapy
8. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR)
9. Neurofeedback
10. Tai Chi
11. Personal growth workshops
12. Support groups
13. Xanax
14. Sertralin
15. Venlaxafin
16. Mirtazapine
17. Shiatsu
18. Dialectical Behavior Therapy
19. Lamictal
20. Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy
21. Bibliotherapy
22. Synthroid
23. SAM-e

Another new thing on this chart: alcohol was added as a treatment, and was rated to make depression worse instead of better.

To navigate the graph above:

The top right quadrant shows the most popular and effective treatments, and the top left quadrant shows treatments that not many people have tried but that have above-average effectiveness, so they may be options to think about (e.g. the 23 treatments listed above).

Treatments in the lower right quadrant are ones that lots of people have tried but that have below-average effectiveness (e.g. caffeine, fish oil), and treatments in the lower left quadrant are reported as neither popular nor effective, so you may want to consider this when choosing a treatment (e.g. Effexor, Paxil).

Where did this data come from? CureTogether members have been anonymously sharing symptoms and treatments for almost 3 years now. We analyzed and visualized the data into infographic form to make it more accessible. To thank everyone for their contributions, we’re releasing this result back to the community for free.

This is part of our regular series of research findings. Of course, with each of these findings, there is a potential bias in patient self-selection and recall. Every research study has some bias, so we present these findings as just what they are – patient-reported data – to stimulate discussion and generate new insights for further research. Stay tuned for more and please let us know in the comments below if this was helpful or interesting for you.

Please tweet, blog, or pass this along to anyone who can benefit or is interested in depression. Thank you!

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Top 15 Treatments for Mitral Valve Prolapse

March 30th, 2011 Alexandra Carmichael Posted in Infographics, Research Findings 8 Comments »

For the live-updated, interactive version of this infographic, click here.

Heart palpitations, fatigue, anxiety, a feeling of dread, shortness of breath, trouble sleeping. For most people with Mitral Valve Prolapse, symptoms are mild, but often uncomfortable enough to want to do something about it.

Fortunately, there are simple lifestyle changes that help, as well as medications. At CureTogether, 460 people have reported having MVP, and 227 of them have contributed 2,526 data points on their ratings of 37 treatment ideas.

Here are the top 15 treatments for Mitral Valve Prolapse, as rated by people living with it:

1. Avoid caffeine
2. Air conditioning
3. Avoid alcohol
4. Drink lots of water
5. Diet changes
6. Meditation
7. Xanax
8. Avoid sugar
9. Beta blockers
10. Eat salt
11. Cognitive therapy
12. Exercise
13. Propranolol
14. Acupuncture
15. Epsom salt bath

To navigate the graph above:

The top right quadrant shows the most popular and effective treatments, and the top left quadrant shows treatments that not many people have tried but that have above-average effectiveness, so they may be options to think about (e.g. Xanax, eating salt).

Treatments in the lower right quadrant are ones that lots of people have tried but that have below-average effectiveness (e.g. B Vitamins, Aspirin), and treatments in the lower left quadrant are reported as neither popular nor effective, so you may want to consider this when choosing a treatment (e.g. St. John’s Wort, Wellbutrin).

Where did this data come from? CureTogether members have been anonymously sharing symptoms and treatments for almost 3 years now. We analyzed and visualized the data into infographic form to make it more accessible. To thank everyone for their contributions, we’re releasing this result back to the community for free.

This is part of a series of research findings we’ve been publishing over the past few months. Of course, with each of these findings, there is a potential bias in patient self-selection and recall. Every research study has some bias, so we present these findings as just what they are – patient-reported data – to stimulate discussion and generate new insights for further research. Stay tuned for more and please let us know in the comments below if this was helpful or interesting for you.

Please tweet, blog, or pass this along to anyone who can benefit or is interested in Mitral Valve Prolapse. Thank you!

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome: New Data on Treatments That Work

March 16th, 2011 Alexandra Carmichael Posted in Infographics, Research Findings 8 Comments »

For the live-updated, interactive version of this infographic, click here.

If you’re like 15% of the population, you may be living with Irritable Bowel Syndrome, whether you know its name or not. And if you do have this chronic bloating, uncomfortable bowel pain, you may be wondering what to do about it.

Hundreds of people in the same boat have some ideas for you.

At CureTogether, 2,341 people have reported having IBS, and 358 of them have contributed 2,936 data points on their ratings of 49 treatment ideas.

So what works best for patients with IBS? Avoiding foods that cause flare-ups and reducing stress take top spots in patient reports.

To navigate the graph above:

The top right quadrant shows the most popular and effective treatments, and the top left quadrant shows treatments that not many people have tried but that have above-average effectiveness, so they may be options to think about (e.g. Physical therapy, yoga).

Treatments in the lower right quadrant are ones that lots of people have tried but that have below-average effectiveness (e.g. fiber supplements, fish oil), and treatments in the lower left quadrant are reported as neither popular nor effective, so you may want to consider this when choosing a treatment (e.g. Evening primrose oil, Peppermint oil).

Where did this data come from? CureTogether members have been anonymously sharing symptoms and treatments for almost 3 years now. We analyzed and visualized the data into infographic form to make it more accessible. To thank everyone for their contributions, we’re releasing this result back to the community for free.

This is part of a series of research findings we’ve been publishing over the past few months. Of course, with each of these findings, there is a potential bias in patient self-selection and recall. Every research study has some bias, so we present these findings as just what they are – patient-reported data – to stimulate discussion and generate new insights for further research. Stay tuned for more and please let us know in the comments below if this was helpful or interesting for you.

Please tweet, blog, or pass this along to anyone who can benefit or is interested in IBS. Thank you!

 

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Infertility-Asthma Link Confirmed

March 7th, 2011 Alexandra Carmichael Posted in Infographics, Research Findings 1 Comment »

It’s time to start repeating some of our earlier studies to see if they hold up with the larger dataset we’ve now gathered in collaboration with our nearly 25,000 marvelous members.

The very first discovery we announced, back in September 2009, was an association between Infertility and Asthma. The 2009 finding was based on an analysis of 324 members, and revealed that members with Infertility were 1.9x more likely to report Asthma.

We just re-ran the analysis (15 months later), with data from 3,735 members (11.5x larger sample!) and we discovered that… the association still holds.


 

 

The gritty details: within the 253 people reporting infertility, 51 (20%) reported having asthma (the remaining 202 out of 253 specifically said they did NOT have asthma). Within the 3482 people reporting “no infertility”, 504 (14%) reported having asthma (the remaining 2978 specifically reported NOT having asthma).

This 20% vs. 14% relative risk is statistically significant with a 99% confidence interval of 1.1-1.8x. It’s a smaller effect size than our original discovery (1.4x instead of 1.9x), but demonstrates a level of consistency and robustness in the data being gathered.

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